RelationalAI Configuration#

Basic#

Using a Configuration File#

To configure a new RelationalAI project after setting up a virtual environment and doing pip install relationalai, use the rai init command from your project’s root directory:

rai init             # if the environment is already activated
.venv/bin/rai init   # if the environment is not activated

This command asks you to use which platform you want to use (Snowflake or Azure), and then asks for the necessary credentials to connect to the platform. It writes this information in a file called raiconfig.toml in your project root. This configuration information will be used by any Python process running from this directory or any of its subdirectories.

The configuration options, along with default values, are as follows for Snowflake:

platform = "snowflake"
user = ""
password = ""
account = ""
role = "PUBLIC"
warehouse = ""
database = ""
rai_app_name = ""
engine = ""

And for Azure:

platform = "azure"
host = "azure.relationalai.com"
port = 443
region = "us-east"
scheme = "https"
client_credentials_url = "https://login.relationalai.com/oauth/token"
client_id = ""
client_secret = ""

When you do rai init, it will put sets of configuration values in TOML tables that we call profiles. Here’s an example showing a profile called field-team:

[profile.field-team]
platform = "azure"
host = "azure.relationalai.com"
port = 443
region = "us-east"
scheme = "https"
client_credentials_url = "https://login.relationalai.com/oauth/token"
client_id = ""
client_secret = ""

To use specific profile, you can specify the profile name in rai.Model() in your Python code, as in rai.Model(profile="my-other-profile"). Alternatively, you can assign the active_profile key in the config table:

active_profile = "field-team"

[profile.field-team]
platform = "azure"
host = "azure.relationalai.com"
port = 443
region = "us-east"
scheme = "https"
client_credentials_url = "https://login.relationalai.com/oauth/token"
client_id = ""
client_secret = ""

Manual Configuration#

If you want to avoid using raiconfig.toml, you can manually configure the RelationalAI package by constructing a configuration object in your code. Typically this would be done in conjunction with environment variables, so that you don’t have to hard-code your credentials in your code:

import relationalai as rai
from relationalai.clients import config as cfg
import os

config = cfg.Config({
    "platform": "snowflake",
    "user": "my_username",
    "password": os.getenv("SNOWFLAKE_PASSWORD"),
    "account": "my_account",
    "role": "PUBLIC",
    "warehouse": "my_warehouse",
    "database": "my_database",
    "rai_app_name": "my_app_name",
    "engine": "my_engine",
})

model = rai.Model(config=config)

The RAI_PROFILE environment variable#

If the RAI_PROFILE environment variable is set and the profile and config parameters of rai.Model are not supplied, the relationalai package will use RAI_PROFILE to determine which raiconfig.toml profile to use.

Where do I find my credentials?#

The rai init command will help you fill in many of the values you need. However, there are a few values you will need to find separately.

Snowflake#

Your Snowflake user and password are the same values you use to log in to the Snowflake web interface. To find your account value, log into https://app.snowflake.com and then look at the part of the URL after https://app.snowflake.com and replace the slash with a dash. For example, if your URL were https://app.snowflake.com/plvoura/client_solutions, the value you should use for account in your credentials is plvoura-client_solutions.

Azure#

To get your client_id and client_secret, you will need to create an OAuth client in the Console. Visit https://console.relationalai.com, log in, and click the Settings icon in the left sidebar. If you don’t have a gear-shaped icon there, it means that you don’t have the necessary permissions to create an OAuth client. You will need to ask your administrator to create one for you.

On the Settings page, click New OAuth CLient, then select the checkboxes corresponding to the permissions you want to give the OAuth client. For example, you might select the top-level transaction, database, and engine permissions. Then click Save at the bottom of the page. You will see your client ID and secret in the top right corner; you can click the copy icon on each one to copy them to your clipboard.i

Advanced#

Profiles#

If you want to re-use credentials across multiple projects, you can save a raiconfig.toml file in the directory ~/.rai, where ~ is your home directory. Here’s an example of what such a file might look like:

[profile.field-team]
platform = "snowflake"
user = "my_username"
password = "my_password"
account = "my_account"
role = "PUBLIC"
warehouse = "my_warehouse"
database = "my_database"
rai_app_name = "my_app_name"
engine = "my_engine"

[profile.engineering-team]
platform = "Azure"
host = "azure.relationalai.com"
port = 443
region = "us-east"
scheme = "https"
client_credentials_url = "https://login.relationalai.com/oauth/token"
client_id = "my_client_id"
client_secret = "my_client_secret"

This file has two profiles, namely field-team and engineering-team.

To use the configuration file from ~/.rai, you can a save raiconfig.toml in your project directory that looks like this:

active_profile = "field-team"

:bulb: You can change your active profile using the CLI subcommand rai profile:switch.

The relationalai package will fill in the values from the field-team profile in ~/.rai/raiconfig.toml.

You can also override configuration keys from the parent configuration file by specifying them in the child configuration file. For example, if you wanted to use your field-team profile but with a different engine for a particular project, you could use a raiconfig.toml file like this:

active_profile = "field-team"
engine = "special_field_team_engine"

Snowflake connections#

If you have a Snowflake connection file at ~/.snowflake/connections.toml, you can re-use those credentials by using a snowflake_connection key. For example, your ~/.snowflake/connections.toml file might look like this:

[my-snowflake-connection]
account = "my_account"
user = "my_username"
password = "my_password"
warehouse = "my_warehouse"
database = "my_database"
schema = "my_schema"
role = "PUBLIC"

And your raiconfig.toml file might look like this:

snowflake_connection = "my-snowflake-connection"
rai_app_name = "my_app_name"
engine = "my_engine"

Notice that the raiconfig.toml specifies keys that are not present in the ~/.snowflake/connections.toml file. If there are any keys in common, the raiconfig.toml file takes precedence.